Battle of Loos

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th November 1915.  Henry Napier, A Social 1890.  Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded in the Battle of Loos. Drowned in the sinking of the hospital ship HMS Anglia.

 

HMS Anglia hit a German mine just outside Dover. The majority of the wounded and nursing staff were lost. The steamer Lusitania, which came to her aid, was also destroyed by a mine after launching life boats to help save the personnel on the Anglia.

 

Henry Napier had retired from active service in 1909. He was recalled to the Sherwood Foresters in 1914.  Aged 39

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters. Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Silver, moonstone and amethyst cross designed for Radley College by George Sedding, 1910

Silver, moonstone and amethyst cross designed for Radley College by George Sedding, 1910

Today we remember …

 

23 October 1915.  George Sedding, A Social 1896.  Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt.  Died of wounds received in the Battle of Loos.

 

He was a silversmith, a follower of the Arts and Crafts Movement. An example of his jewellery survives in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. In 1910, he designed and gave the cross and candlesticks which are still on the communion table in Radley College chapel. He was a committed Christian. One of his last letters home shows both his deep love of God and of the jewel bright colours of nature, written in the horror of Ploegsteert Wood:

I wrote a little prayer last night. . . . There are such a lot of stray bullets about that you want something of the sort to repeat and think of on occasions. ‘Under the shadow of Thy wings, 0 Christ, shall I rest in peace. For as in love they enfold me, I will look up and behold their shining glory, arched in a vault of dusky gold, gleaming with rainbow hues. Gold for sovereignty and power, with all the wondrous graces, charity and love, that colour Thy divinity. So shall I rest in peace, and at my death, 0 Light of Lights, give me grace to come without the shadows, and to look upon Thy most holy face.‘’

 

Aged 33

George Sedding, Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt.  Died of wounds 23 October 1915

George Sedding, Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt. Died of wounds 23 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

16th October 1915.  Roland Logan, E Social 1896.  Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

He was a career soldier who had served in the Second South African War in 1900.

Aged 33

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia 16 October 1915

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia 16 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of AL Badcock at Elzenwalle.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of AL Badcock at Elzenwalle. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

14th October 1915.  Arthur Badcock, C Social 1908.  Lt, 6th Bn, Yorkshire Light Infantry.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

At the outbreak of the war he was studying medicine at St John’s College, Cambridge. He and his brother, Edmund, volunteered immediately in 1914. Edmund was killed on the Somme in 1916

 

Aged 21

Arthur Badcock, Lt, 6th Bn, Yorkshire LI.  kia 14 October 1915

Arthur Badcock, Lt, 6th Bn, Yorkshire LI. kia 14 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

13th October 1915.  Richard Coote, A Social 1906.  Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  Killed in action at Hulluch, Battle of Loos.

 

After school he trained as a lawyer at Lincoln’s Inn. Whilst living in London he was a very active supporter of the Radley Mission at St Peter’s, Wapping.

 

Aged 23.  He was one of three brothers who all served in WW1. His brother, George, fell in 1918

 

 

 

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  kia 13 October 1915

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. kia 13 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Malcolm Gibson at Vermelles.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Malcolm Gibson at Vermelles. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

8th October 1915.  Malcolm Gibson,  A Social 1906.  Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

Aged 23.  His brother, Edgar, also fell in the Great War

Malcolm Gibson, Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt. kia 8 October 1915

Malcolm Gibson, Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt. kia 8 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th September 1915.  Llewellyn Nash, F Social 1909.  Captain, 2nd Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps.  Died at Lozenghem, of wounds received in action at Vermelles during the Battle of Loos.

 

He left Radley early to go to Eton College and then to Sandhurst.

 

Aged 20.  His brother, Edward, also fell in the Great War

Llewellyn Nash, Captain, 2nd Bn, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  Died of wounds 28 September 1915

Llewellyn Nash, Captain, 2nd Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Died of wounds 28 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

This must be considered the darkest day in the history of Radley College. Eleven men from the College fell on this one day during the Battle of Loos and an unknown number were wounded. Many of the men were volunteers in Kitchener’s New Army, so the list of the Fallen includes young men from Radley village who had worked for the College and the first serving schoolmaster to be killed.

Although the long-drawn out campaigns of Gallipoli, the First Battle of the Somme, the Third Battle of Ypres (Paschendaele) claimed more lives overall, 25th September must stand forever as a day of mourning.

Lancelot Vidal, Schoolmaster, Tutor of A Social.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Reported missing, believed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘For days, even weeks, we entertained hopes that the news might be false, but eight weeks have now elapsed, and we can now only fear the worst.  He was last seen in the German trenches in the attack on Sept. 25th. when in charge of a machine gun … it has since been learnt that he was killed by a shell whilst pushing forward with his section in the early morning of September 25.’

Lance Vidal was the first serving schoolmaster of Radley College to fall in the Great War. He volunteered in 1914, having held the post of Tutor of A Social for two weeks. He was a popular Don at Radley and was one of those instrumental in introducing and promoting rugby football as the school’s major sport. He had played for Harlequins before joining Radley. He was also Master in Charge of Cricket.

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Ronald Trotter on the Ploegsteert Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Ronald Trotter on the Ploegsteert Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Ronald Trotter, F Social 1899.  Lt, Royal Berkshire Regt.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

Aged 30

Ronald Trotter, Lt, Royal Berkshire Regt.  kia 25 September 1915

Ronald Trotter, Lt, Royal Berkshire Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Charles King on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Charles King on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Charles King, F Social 1911.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  He went up to Sandhurst immediately on leaving school. Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos

“King … must have died like a hero, poor fellow, because the Huns have erected a large cross in their trenches on which is written: ‘In memory of Lieut. King and Lieut. Hall and several men of the S. Staffordshire Regiment who died like heroes.”’ Letter from Lt TP Gibbons

The Radleian 26.11.1915:  £5.5.0 given to the Radley Motor Ambulance Fund in memory of 2nd Lieut CW King

Aged 18

Charles King, 2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  kia 25 September 1915

Charles King, 2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt. kia 25 September 1915