Canada/Canadian Expeditionary Force

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lionel Bostock at Albert Communal Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2016

The grave of Lionel Bostock at Albert Communal Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2016

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

20th September 1916. Lionel Bostock. B Social, 1900. 2nd Corporal, 3rd Division Signal Company. Canadian Engineers, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Killed in action.

Lionel Bostock’s family was originally from Chichester where ‘he was very well known and had many friends.’ When the War broke out, he was in British Columbia and enlisted in the British Columbia Horse. He was in the 3rd Canadian Division.

He was in the trenches near Ypres throughout the winter of 1915. A letter from the Chaplain of the 3rd Canadian Division says:

The poor boy was instantly killed on the 20th. The Germans were shelling the town heavily, and one shell exploded in the midst of a number of our boys, killing Corporal Bostock instantly.

Aged 28

Lionel Bostock, 2nd Corporal, 3rd Div Signal Company, Canadian Expeditionary Force. kia Battle of the Somme

Lionel Bostock, 2nd Corporal, 3rd Div Signal Company, Canadian Expeditionary Force. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

18th August 1916. Aubrey Patch. C Social, 1899. 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. Killed in action.

After school he went to study at Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto. When war broke out he immediately returned to England from Canada to enlist, and served in the ranks for about a year.  He received his commission in October 1915. He was killed while leading his platoon against a German trench.

Aged 30

Aubrey Patch, 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Aubrey Patch, 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

5th June 1916.  Thornton Boyd,  E Social, 1905.  Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds received in action at Zilleheke in the Battle of Mount Sorrel.

 

Thornton Boyd was born in Canada at Bobcaygeon, Ontario. He left Radley in 1908 to return to Canada where he studied engineering at McGill University in Montreal. He graduated in 1912.

He joined up as a Private with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in August 1915, arriving on the Western Front in February 1916.

Aged 26

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia's Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

18th March 1916.  Geoffrey Graves, E Social, 1907.  Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles, (Saskatchewan Regiment)  Canadian Expeditionary ForceKilled in action in an unknown engagement at Hooge.  Geoffrey Graves has no obituary in The Radleian.  He left Radley in 1910 after just three years.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists him as ‘An intelligence officer’. We have no further information.  Aged 22

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles.  kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Walter Simpson at Berks Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Walter Simpson at Berks Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

1st December 1915.  Walter Simpson, D Social 1900.  Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in Flanders.

 

He was a good oarsman who rowed for Cambridge University Trial VIII in 1906, and won the Ladies Plate at Henley in 1907.

 

Aged 29

 

Walter Simpson, Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  kia 1 December 1915

Walter Simpson, Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force. kia 1 December 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

11th August 1915.  Francis York, E Social 1898.  Sergeant, 9th Bn, West Yorkshire Regt.  Killed in action at Gallipoli.  After school he spent some time ranching in Canada.  Aged 31

Francis York, Sergeant, 9th Bn, West Yorkshire Regt.  kia 9 August 1915

Francis York, Sergeant, 9th Bn, West Yorkshire Regt. kia 9 August 1915

The Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Francis York commemorated on the Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Francis York commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

On 4th May 1915, William Schreiber, G Social 1900, died of wounds received in the Second Battle of Ypres. He was a Lieutenant with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, serving in the mechanical transport division of the Canadian Army Service Corps stationed at the 1st Canadian Ammunition Park. He came from a military family: both his father and grandfather held the rank of colonel. He left Radley in 1902 and emigrated to Canada before 1910. He was married twice: first to Marie in 1910, and then to Gabrielle in 1914. We knew nothing more about his life until a researcher sent this note in 2013:
‘It is the case that my grandfather and two others – including William Eric Brymer Schreiber – set up Britain’s first motor car agency selling Ford cars in the early 1900s.’ – information supplied by Robin Thornton, 1st June 2013So he was probably using his skills and interest in cars to serve the war effort.

Lt WE Schreiber, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds on 4th May 1915

Lt WE Schreiber, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died of wounds on 4th May 1915