Captain

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

3rd February 1917.  John Partington. B Social 1898. Captain, 4th Bn, Devonshire Regt.. Killed in action, Second Battle of Kut-el-Amara, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

‘He went up to Pembroke College, Cambridge, with an exhibition in 1903, and took honours in the Classical Tripos in 1907. At the outbreak of war he was Classical Master at St. Edward’s School, Oxford, and received his commission in the Devons in October, 1914. He was promoted temporary captain in December, 1914, and went out at that time with his battalion to India. During 1915 he was sent to Australia on special service, returning to India in the autumn of that year.  In October, 1916, he was transferred to another front, and fell in action on February 3.’

Aged 32

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

 

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

19th December 1916

Guy Boddington. F Social, 1906. Captain, 6th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. Missing.

Guy Boddington was last seen alive on 19th December, 1916. In March 1917, The Radleian magazine reported him as ‘wounded and probably a prisoner of war in German hands.’ He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial alongside all those others who have no known grave.

Before the War, he worked as a woollen merchant.

Aged 25

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

15th November 1916. Edwin Charrington. D Social, 1905. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After leaving school, Edwin Charrington started work for Union Insurance Society of Canton, in London, with the view of going out to China later. But after two years’ service he relinquished his position, and on the outbreak of the War obtained a commission in the Essex Regiment. He left for the Front on 14th February, 1915, returning to Britain at the end of May, badly wounded and disfigured. After a few months’ leave, he rejoined his regiment, and on 31st May, 1916 he again left for the Front.

His Colonel wrote: I had the greatest regard for him and a high opinion of his capabilities as an officer. He was beloved by all who knew him, and a most gallant officer and loyal friend, and he will be keenly missed by all ranks.

He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 25

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th BN, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th November, 1916. Vivian Fanning. G Social, 1911. Capt., 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After school, he went to Sandhurst to train for a military career. He received his commission in June 1915 and was promoted to Captain in June 1916. He went to the Front in August 1916. His colonel wrote to his father:

His captain had been killed, and he was commanding his company, which he did right well. I offer you the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers. We feel we have lost one of the best of comrades, and the men do too.

At his death, Vivian was the younger of two brothers. His father later married again and had a third son, Peter, born five years after Vivian’s death. Peter was killed in World War 2. A joint memorial to the brothers is outside Radley College Chapel.

Aged 19

Vivian Fanning.  Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia at Beaumont Hamel

Vivian Fanning. Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

7th October 1916. Walter Birch. G Social, 1905. Capt., 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Le Sars.

Walter Birch was a superb sportsman who represented the school at cricket, soccer and Fives. After Radley he went to Oriel College, Oxford. At the outbreak of the War he enlisted in the City of London Territorials. He obtained a commission in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 19I4. He went to France in May, 1915, but was wounded in the following August, losing the sight of one eye. He was mentioned in dispatches on January 1916. He went out to the Front again in September 1916.

His major wrote:

He was killed in action leading his company with the greatest gallantry. He was a fearless officer, and when he was shot he was right ahead of his company and leading them splendidly, and was a fine example. Just before reaching the German trench he was slightly hit by a machine-gun bullet and fell into a shell-hole. On attempting to rise a sniper must have seen him, and shot him in the head.

Aged 25

Walter Birch, Captain, 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia Battle of the Somme

Walter Birch, Captain, 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Robinson, JY Shield NU4croppedToday we remember …

Mesopotamia Campaign

23rd August 1916. John Robinson, MC. A Social, 1899. Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt.. Died of wounds received in the Battle of El Hannah, Mesopotamia (now Iraq).

John Robinson was one of the most distinguished Radleians to die in the War. At school he played for the Cricket and Football XIs and was Head of A Social. After school, he went to Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated with honours in history. He played Hockey for Oxford University for four years, became an international player and went on to win Gold for Great Britain at the 1908 Olympics.

After leaving university he became a schoolmaster. He enlisted in an OTC immediately War was declared, receiving his commission in September 1914. He served in the Gallipoli Campaign. He was Mentioned in Dispatches and awarded the Military Cross in February, 1916. The same month he was sent to Mesopotamia. He was wounded in the spine in April and died from the injury in August 1916.

His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 31

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th July 1915. Charles Wright. G Social, 1904. Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. Killed in action at Bazentin-le-Petit.

On leaving school he went to Hertford College, Oxford, where he entered as an exhibitioner in October, 1909. He achieved a third class in the Final Honour School of Modern History in 1913. He rowed in the Hertford Eight for three years, and in his third year was Captain of Boats and President of the College.

After leaving Oxford he went to teach at Earleywood School, Ascot. War was declared on 4th August 1914. Charles had already joined the Inns of Court OTC on 3rd August. He obtained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment on 24th September, 1914, and was gazetted captain in August of 1915.

Aged 25

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

AH 'Sam' Hales, Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt. kia First Battle of the Somme

AH ‘Sam’ Hales, Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt. kia First Battle of the Somme

Today we remember…

5th July 1916. Arthur Hoare ‘Sam’ Hales, MC. Schoolmaster.  Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt.  Killed in action at Canal du Nord, Battle of the Somme.

‘Sam’ Hales was educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, taking honours in moderations and in the final school of modern history. He was in the Rugby School XV of 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and the Monkstown team of 1902. At Oxford he was a rowing ‘Blue’ and rowed in the 1904 and 1905 Boat Race crews. He was an extremely popular teacher at Radley where he was one of the group of young Dons who encouraged the growth of Rugby as the school’s major sport.

He enlisted immediately war was declared in August 1914, as a private. He was awarded his commission ‘for gallantry.’ He won the Military Cross in March 1915 ‘for bringing in the wounded under heavy fire.’

The Radleian published a letter from him describing everyday life in the trenches:

I have heard several times from Mr. Hales, who is sergeant in the Wiltshires. It will be news to hear that, during his first three days in the trenches, even he was absolutely dead beat, as they had to carry up sandbags to mend the gaps in the trenches. His legs absolutely gave out. On the first night he fell into a Jack Johnson hole and was not dry for a week afterwards. Nor could he use his rifle for a day and a half as it was jammed with mud. He is full of praise for the food and bully beef. He has been under heavy fire several times, but he claims to be very good at keeping his head down. When we returned this term we heard that he had been wounded, but his own account is as follows; “A graze on head and arm from a bullet that splintered through a sand bag. Both wounds quite dry by the time I left the trenches next day.’’