career serviceman

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

14th May 1917

Alfred Mark Wardlaw, G Social 1881. Major, 9th Bn, Royal Sussex Regt.  Died at home in Sussex as a result of wounds sustained in March 1917

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Soccer XI and rowed for the VIII.  After school, he became a career soldier with the Royal Sussex Regiment, achieving the rank of Captain.  He retired in 1900.  He returned to active service in 1914, with the rank of Acting Major.

He married Alfreda, daughter of Major-General Chapman in 1894.  She died in 1914.  He added the surname ‘Wardlaw’ to his family name of ‘Mark’ in 1895.

His ashes are in Golders Green Crematorium. His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 49

The shield of AP Mark (aft. Wardlaw) in Radley College Hall

About Radley College’s Prefects Shields

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

4th April 1917

John Egerton-Leigh, G Social 1890. Captain, 10th Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action at Metz-en-Couture, during the German Retreat to the Hindenberg Line

He was a career soldier from 1897, serving in the Second South African War until 1902. He then went out to Canada as a farmer until the outbreak of WW1 in 1914.

He went to France in July 1915, and served on the Ypres Salient February to July, 1916, being wounded at Ypres. He afterwards served on the Somme, was at the taking of Guillemont, and was again wounded there, being mentioned in despatches January 4th, 1917. After he was wounded at Ypres he carried in his sergeant, who was also wounded. Finding him too heavy he came in for assistance. and went out again himself in spite of a very nasty rifle fire, and brought him in. He died leading his Company into action. After being wounded once he persevered until a bullet killed him outright. He was buried close to where he fell, just south of Metz-en-Couture and some ten miles from Cambrai.

Aged 41

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th November, 1916. Vivian Fanning. G Social, 1911. Capt., 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After school, he went to Sandhurst to train for a military career. He received his commission in June 1915 and was promoted to Captain in June 1916. He went to the Front in August 1916. His colonel wrote to his father:

His captain had been killed, and he was commanding his company, which he did right well. I offer you the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers. We feel we have lost one of the best of comrades, and the men do too.

At his death, Vivian was the younger of two brothers. His father later married again and had a third son, Peter, born five years after Vivian’s death. Peter was killed in World War 2. A joint memorial to the brothers is outside Radley College Chapel.

Aged 19

Vivian Fanning.  Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia at Beaumont Hamel

Vivian Fanning. Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th September 1916. Alfred Benson. F Social, 1880. Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on active service in the bombing of Scarborough.

Alfred Benson was a career soldier, serving as a surgeon with the RAMC. He served throughout the South African War. He was wounded at Johannesburg while attached to the Gordon Highlanders. He received the Queen’s medal with five clasps and the King’s medal with two clasps and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener’s dispatches. Already retired, at the outbreak of the War Major Benson volunteered for service, and for eight months was in France, and then with the Home Forces. He left a widow, a daughter, and a son who was also serving in France.

The bombing of Scarborough was the first attack on a civilian target on mainland Britain.

Aged 52

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

19th September 1916. Ronald Rose-Lloyd. F Social, 1898. Major, King’s African Rifles. Killed in action in East Africa (now Tanzania).

Ronald Rose-Lloyd was a career soldier who joined the Army immediately upon leaving school. He came 1st in his year in the Military Competitive Exam in 1906 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1907. He was serving in East Africa when the War began, and then attached to the King’s African Rifles. He was Mentioned in Despatches.

He is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

Aged 32

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King's African Rifles. kia East Africa

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King’s African Rifles. kia East Africa

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

24th July 1916. Lesley Douglas-Hamilton. A Social, 1896. Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action.

He was a career soldier whose original commission was in the Cameron Highlanders in September, 1901. He was promoted to Captain in 1905.  He served in the last year of the 2nd South African War and elsewhere in the colonies. He was awarded the Queen’s Medal with five clasps.

As a serving soldier, when the War began he was transferred from his original regiment and given a commission as a Major with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

Aged 35

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

21st July 1915. John Mowbray, DSO. H & D Socials, 1889. Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action.

At Radley, he rowed in the First VIII. After leaving school he trained as a civil engineer. He then changed career to become a soldier. He received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in July, 1900, and joined a battery in India. He was afterwards transferred to the Royal Horse Artillery, with which he remained until entering the Staff College, Quetta, in 1907. On passing out he was appointed to the General Staff at Simla, where he remained until 1913. He went to France as staff captain in August, 1914, and became brigade major on a divisional staff three months later. He resigned in the spring of 1916 in order to take command of a field battery. He was promoted captain in August, 1911, and major in December, 1914. For his services in France he was twice Mentioned in Dispatches and received the DSO.

Aged 41

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of the Somme

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme