D Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th March 1917. Reginald Henderson, D Social 1896. Sgt, East African Mounted Rifles. Died of wounds received in action in TanzaniaAt school, he played for the Cricket and Soccer 1st Xis. After school, he was a farmer in British East Africa (now Kenya). At the outbreak of war he was a trooper in the Thika Horse, but transferred into the 27th Mountain Battery R.A., in which he was a sergeant, and died in Nairobi on March 28th, 1917, of injuries received while on service in German East Africa (now Tanzania) in 1916.

RG Henderson, Radley College Cricket XI 1901

RG Henderson, Radley College Cricket XI 1901

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

22nd February 1917. Frederick Raikes, D Social, 1885. 2nd Lt, South Wales Borderers (attd Machine Gun Corps). Killed in action, 2nd Battle of Kut-al-Amara, Mesopotamia Campaign

Frederick Raikes was one of the oldest volunteers to join up.  He was married, with five children, and working as a solicitor when the War began.  At school he was a Junior Scholar and winner of the Heathcote Scholarship for Mathematics. He studied at Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

There was something really  heroic and yet typically English in F. M. Raikes’s offering his life for his country at an age when he might have stayed at home.  “He had high  ideals  and a love  of the  beautiful in  form  and character, in nature and art and literature.”  Again,” he joyed  all  physical effort which taxed  his resourcefulness and  endurance – if it  involved  hardship so  much the better.”  ‘I should like to find myself in a tight corner,’ he said on one occasion.  One of his friends  writes, ‘Never was anyone so full of the spirit of right living and right enjoyment as he.’  Radley has a right to be proud of such a son.

His eldest son was a boy at the school when he was killed.  His death precipitated action on the War Memorial Scholarships Fund and his son was the first boy to receive aid from it.  His nephew, John Raikes, considered Radley’s most promising mathematician, died on the Somme in 1916.

Aged 45

2nd Lt Frederick Raikes, South Wales Borderers. kia Kut-al-Amara

2nd Lt Frederick Raikes, South Wales Borderers. kia Kut-al-Amara

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

15th November 1916. Edwin Charrington. D Social, 1905. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After leaving school, Edwin Charrington started work for Union Insurance Society of Canton, in London, with the view of going out to China later. But after two years’ service he relinquished his position, and on the outbreak of the War obtained a commission in the Essex Regiment. He left for the Front on 14th February, 1915, returning to Britain at the end of May, badly wounded and disfigured. After a few months’ leave, he rejoined his regiment, and on 31st May, 1916 he again left for the Front.

His Colonel wrote: I had the greatest regard for him and a high opinion of his capabilities as an officer. He was beloved by all who knew him, and a most gallant officer and loyal friend, and he will be keenly missed by all ranks.

He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 25

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th BN, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

18th October 1916. Arthur Evans. D Social, 1892. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action.

Arthur Evans came to Radley as a Junior Scholar. He won the James Scholarship, the Heathcote Scholarship, the Gibbs Scholarship and the English Literature Prize, became a Prefect, and played for the Soccer 1st XI and the Fives team. After school he won an Exhibition to Lincoln College, Oxford. He taught in prep schools for several years until the outbreak of the War. He then joined up as a member of the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment.) He later transferred to the Essex Regiment. He has no known grave so is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 38

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail - Warden & Prefects 1896

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail – Warden & Prefects 1896

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Mesopotamia Campaign

17th September 1916. John Bankes-Price. D Social, 1909. Flt-Lt, Royal Naval Air Service. Killed in action at El Arish, Mesopotamia (now Iraq).

John Bankes-Price was the son of the British Consul in Chicago. He joined the Royal Naval Air Service in 1915. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial. Aged 21

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

27th August 1916. Walter Brown. D Social, 1897. Private, 15th Bn, Australian Imperial Force. Killed in action at Pozieres.

Walter Brown was born in Wigan, Lancashire. After leaving school, he returned home for a short while, working in cotton manufacturing. Then he emigrated to Australia. He enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force and returned to Europe early in 1916. He has no known grave so is listed on the Australian Forces Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

19th March 1916.  Mervyn Richardson, D Social, 1908.  Capt, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement.‘Tracker’ Richardson was one of the young officers mentioned in Siegfried Sassoon’s diary, which became his fictional Memoirs of a fox-hunting man. At Radley he was Captain of the Boats, and rowed twice at Henley in the Ladies’ Plate, rowing No. 6 in the winning heat v. University College, Oxford, in 1912. He was a member of the Leander Club. After leaving school, he attended Sandhurst, then went straight out to the Western Front in 1915. He was Mentioned in Despatches.  A letter from the Regimental Chaplain to his parents describes the scene of his funeral:CHAPLAIN’S LETTER, March 22 (Wed.).

DEAR SIR,-You might care I think to know the details of your son’s burial and last resting place from the Chaplain of the Regiment?… Your son was the most gallant and best loved of a gallant band of young officers… I have been with the battalion a year, and through more than one action, yet I do not remember so solemn a funeral or such real quiet grief. It took place on Tuesday night at 9.45. The little burial ground lies in a slight hollow only 100 yards behind the front lines. The nearest village is Reanite, near Albert, but from there it is a walk of two miles over rolling chalk downs to the line. The little plot is reverently tended, and a cross already in position on the grave. At the end of the war you will find no difficulty in finding it and tending it as you like.

As we left the dug-outs for the cemetery, two canisters burst quite near with a deafening roar. There in the darkness I took the service. All the officers were present and many men. The moon came out in the middle, and shone on the grey steel helmets of the group, and made the colours of the Union Jack that lay on the body gleam. The service ended, to the roar of another German canister, more suitable perhaps to the occasion than any organ.

Eric Milner-White

Aged 22

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died of wounds 19 March 1916