died of wounds

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Humfrey Cole's grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' July 2015

Humfrey Cole’s grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Today we remember …

12th February 1917. Humfrey Cole, A Social 1910. 2nd Lt, Yorkshire Regiment

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

He went straight into the army from school, gazetted to the London Regiment in September 1915.

Aged 20

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

13th September 1916

Richard Brodie-James. G Social, 1908. Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt.Killed in action in Greece.

Richard Brodie-James was killed near Macukovo in Greece. His name is recorded on the Doiran Memorial. He was Mentioned in Despatches. The letter from his colonel to his parents says:

Your son was as gallant, cool, and capable an officer as I have met in my 32 years’ soldiering. . . . He is a loss to the regiment and the Army, for his quickness and ability were much above the average. We were all proud of him, and the men speak of him enthusiastically. In the list of recommendations for recognition which I have just sent in your son’s name stands first. Living or dead he deserves the tribute – and more.

Aged 23

&

Henry Skinner. A Social, 1910. Private, 1/4th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme.

Henry Skinner was one of very few Radleians who enlisted as a Private.

He went from Radley to Abingdon School and from there to Jesus College, Cambridge, where his grandfather was a fellow.

Aged 21

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

First Battle of the Somme

 

3rd July 1916.  Lancelot Curteis, G Social, 1906.  2nd Lt, 8th Bn, Border Regt.  Killed in action, Battle of the Somme.

 

At school Lancelot Curteis played for the 1st XI Soccer team. He joined the University and Public Schools Corps in September, 1914. He obtained his commission in the Border Regiment in May, 1915, and went to France in December, 1915.

A letter from his Company Commander to his parents:

Your son was a splendid officer, and the men were simply devoted to him. He led them magnificently in our charge on the German trenches as steadily and coolly as on parade. He was shot soon after we had occupied them, fighting hard and cheerily to the last. The Commanding Officer had the greatest confidence in him. I have lost in him a personal friend, and a most efficient officer, who died, as he had lived, a very gallant gentleman.

Aged 23

& 

Duncan Tuck,  G Social, 1907.  Capt, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Died of wounds received on 17th June near Arras.

Duncan Tuck won a Scholarship to Radley. He went up to Hertford College, Oxford in 1912.

‘In May 1914, he joined the Special Reserve of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and after training at Portsmouth he was in March, 1915, attached to the 2nd Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, and was wounded in the right shoulder on April 23, when the regiment was supporting the left of the Canadians in the second battle of Ypres. Afterwards he was attached to the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, joining them on September 26, the day after they had lost many officers and men on the Menin road. He was six months in the dangerous Ypres salient, and then was moved to Arras. On June 17, while inspecting wire entanglements, he was hit in the chest and right arm when binding up the wounds of another officer.’

Aged 23

Lancelot Curteis, 2nd Lt, 8th bn Border Regt. kia 3 July 1916

Lancelot Curteis, 2nd Lt, 8th bn Border Regt. kia 3 July 1916

Duncan Tuck, Captain, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  Died of wounds 3 July 1916

Duncan Tuck, Captain, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Died of wounds 3 July 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th June 1916.  Cecil Draper,  F Social, 1908.  Lt, 1st Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.  He left school in 1910 to attend Sandhurst.

Cecil Draper’s stepfather, Frederick Wells, also a Radleian, also died on active service on the Western Front. Both are recorded on the War Memorial. Cecil’s mother, Frederick’s widow, was widowed three times before she was 45, and was left to bring up five sons. The family did not send photos for the War Memorial albums.

 

Aged 22

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

5th June 1916.  Thornton Boyd,  E Social, 1905.  Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds received in action at Zilleheke in the Battle of Mount Sorrel.

 

Thornton Boyd was born in Canada at Bobcaygeon, Ontario. He left Radley in 1908 to return to Canada where he studied engineering at McGill University in Montreal. He graduated in 1912.

He joined up as a Private with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in August 1915, arriving on the Western Front in February 1916.

Aged 26

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia's Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th April 1916.  Leslie Inman. F Social, 1903.   2nd Lt, Wiltshire Regt.  Leslie Yardley Inman served with the Royal Scots.  He was attached to the Wiltshire Regiment, serving in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) when he died of wounds received in the Relief of Kut-al-Amara.  At Radley, he played soccer for the Firsts. In 1906, he was Captain of Cricket. He was Head of F Social. After school, he went to Hertford College, Oxford, and then went to work for the London Stock Exchange. He joined the Public School and University Corps soon after the outbreak of war.  He received a commission in the Royal Scots in May, 1915, and left England in the following October. He served in the Gallipoli campaign, before being sent on to Mesopotamia..  There is no photo of him in the War Memorial albums. He is shown here in the Warden & Prefects group photo of 1906Aged 27

Leslie Inman, Prefect, Radley College, 1906

Leslie Inman, Prefect, Radley College, 1906

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

19th March 1916.  Mervyn Richardson, D Social, 1908.  Capt, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement.‘Tracker’ Richardson was one of the young officers mentioned in Siegfried Sassoon’s diary, which became his fictional Memoirs of a fox-hunting man. At Radley he was Captain of the Boats, and rowed twice at Henley in the Ladies’ Plate, rowing No. 6 in the winning heat v. University College, Oxford, in 1912. He was a member of the Leander Club. After leaving school, he attended Sandhurst, then went straight out to the Western Front in 1915. He was Mentioned in Despatches.  A letter from the Regimental Chaplain to his parents describes the scene of his funeral:CHAPLAIN’S LETTER, March 22 (Wed.).

DEAR SIR,-You might care I think to know the details of your son’s burial and last resting place from the Chaplain of the Regiment?… Your son was the most gallant and best loved of a gallant band of young officers… I have been with the battalion a year, and through more than one action, yet I do not remember so solemn a funeral or such real quiet grief. It took place on Tuesday night at 9.45. The little burial ground lies in a slight hollow only 100 yards behind the front lines. The nearest village is Reanite, near Albert, but from there it is a walk of two miles over rolling chalk downs to the line. The little plot is reverently tended, and a cross already in position on the grave. At the end of the war you will find no difficulty in finding it and tending it as you like.

As we left the dug-outs for the cemetery, two canisters burst quite near with a deafening roar. There in the darkness I took the service. All the officers were present and many men. The moon came out in the middle, and shone on the grey steel helmets of the group, and made the colours of the Union Jack that lay on the body gleam. The service ended, to the roar of another German canister, more suitable perhaps to the occasion than any organ.

Eric Milner-White

Aged 22

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

23rd February 1916.  William Wigan, E Social 1909.  Lt, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of shrapnel wounds near Ypres.   He went to Sandhurst in September 1914. 

‘ …. He was in a dug-out two and a half miles behind the firing line, with his Captain and two other subs., when a shell dropped in Battalion Commander’s Headquarters some six yards behind them. The Captain who was nearest the door went out to see what had happened and the other three must have started to follow him when another shell dropped right in the doorway wounding all three. The Captain writes: ‘I went to the dug-out to see what I could do, but your son, who looked very pale. though quite calm, waved me away, saying: “Get away, you are the only one left in the Company.” I then sent for stretcher-bearers and doctor: your son then asked for a cigarette which I gave him and lit it for him. The stretcher-bearers, four in number, then went to him, but he said, ‘Look to the others who are worse first, I shall be all right, I have got one leg broken, and am hit through the other.’ …. As I walked with him he said, ‘ Don’t look so worried about me, I shall be all right; shall see you at home.’  I then had to leave him to take my men to the trenches.

As I said good-bye to him he blew me a kiss and wished me good luck… I cannot tell you how much we valued and loved him, what a good hard-working officer he was… He was beloved of all the men of the Company, who realised his efforts for them. and what a good hard-working officer he was. . . always cheery, courageous, and energetic. . . He was taken suddenly worse on the morning of the 23rd, became unconscious about 2 pm and died about 4 pm.’

 

Aged 20

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt. Died of wounds 23 February 1916