E Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Reginald Hargreaves on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Reginald Hargreaves on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

28th June 1917

Reginald Hargreaves, E Social 1910. Lt, 4th Bn, Durham Light Infantry.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement on his 21st birthday

He joined the Durham L.I. from the O.T.C. in August, 1914, and went to the front in May, 1915. He was severely wounded in October, 1915, and twice again in 1916.His colonel writes:  ‘Your son was killed whilst leading his company in a raid on the enemy’s trenches. During the raid your son’s conduct was most gallant, and his personal bravery was splendid.’

Aged 21

Lt Reginald Hargreaves, Durham LI.  Killed on his 21st birthday

Lt Reginald Hargreaves, Durham LI. Killed on his 21st birthday

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

27th May 1917

Arthur Knapp, E Social 1890. Lt, Nyasaland Field Force.  Died of illness on active service in East Africa

After school, he worked for a short time as an architect, then became a career soldier, serving with the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, then the Grahamstown Militia.  He spent 15 years as a planter in Nyasaland (now part of Malawi). He is buried in Dar-es-Salaam cemetery.

He formerly held a commission as second lieutenant in the Militia battalion of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, and served in the South African War with the Grahamstown Town Guard 1901-2, and obtained the Queen’s Medal. For the last 15 years he had been planting cotton in Nyasaland, but on the outbreak of war he joined the force for East Africa. He received a commission as assistant transport officer, and had lately been recruiting carriers from among the natives.

Aged 43

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

9th September 1916. Arthur Clarke. E Social, 1905. 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. Killed in action at High Wood.

Arthur Clarke’s story exemplifies the horror and confusion of the 1st Battle of the Somme.   He was reported wounded but missing in October, 1916. By June, 1917 this had been amended to ‘believed to have been killed on 9th September 1916.’ His body was recovered and is buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval.

After school, he went to Christ Church, Oxford. When the War broke out he was in Switzerland, unable to return to England until early in September, 1914. When he did get back he immediately enlisted in the North Somerset Yeomanry. He went to the Western Front in October, 1914, and took part in the first battle of Ypres. In February, 1915, he was given a commission and after three months’ training in England rejoined his regiment at the front. He was wounded on 25th September, 1915, in the Battle of Loos, and, after six months’ sick leave, rejoined his regiment. He was slightly wounded on June 27th, 1916, but was able to return to duty after a few weeks in hospital.

He was Mentioned in Dispatches twice.

Aged 25

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Thornton Boyd at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

5th June 1916.  Thornton Boyd,  E Social, 1905.  Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds received in action at Zilleheke in the Battle of Mount Sorrel.

 

Thornton Boyd was born in Canada at Bobcaygeon, Ontario. He left Radley in 1908 to return to Canada where he studied engineering at McGill University in Montreal. He graduated in 1912.

He joined up as a Private with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in August 1915, arriving on the Western Front in February 1916.

Aged 26

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia's Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Thornton Boyd, Corporal, Princess Patricia’s Canadian LI, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died of wounds 5 June 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

18th March 1916.  Geoffrey Graves, E Social, 1907.  Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles, (Saskatchewan Regiment)  Canadian Expeditionary ForceKilled in action in an unknown engagement at Hooge.  Geoffrey Graves has no obituary in The Radleian.  He left Radley in 1910 after just three years.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists him as ‘An intelligence officer’. We have no further information.  Aged 22

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles.  kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

23rd February 1916.  William Wigan, E Social 1909.  Lt, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of shrapnel wounds near Ypres.   He went to Sandhurst in September 1914. 

‘ …. He was in a dug-out two and a half miles behind the firing line, with his Captain and two other subs., when a shell dropped in Battalion Commander’s Headquarters some six yards behind them. The Captain who was nearest the door went out to see what had happened and the other three must have started to follow him when another shell dropped right in the doorway wounding all three. The Captain writes: ‘I went to the dug-out to see what I could do, but your son, who looked very pale. though quite calm, waved me away, saying: “Get away, you are the only one left in the Company.” I then sent for stretcher-bearers and doctor: your son then asked for a cigarette which I gave him and lit it for him. The stretcher-bearers, four in number, then went to him, but he said, ‘Look to the others who are worse first, I shall be all right, I have got one leg broken, and am hit through the other.’ …. As I walked with him he said, ‘ Don’t look so worried about me, I shall be all right; shall see you at home.’  I then had to leave him to take my men to the trenches.

As I said good-bye to him he blew me a kiss and wished me good luck… I cannot tell you how much we valued and loved him, what a good hard-working officer he was… He was beloved of all the men of the Company, who realised his efforts for them. and what a good hard-working officer he was. . . always cheery, courageous, and energetic. . . He was taken suddenly worse on the morning of the 23rd, became unconscious about 2 pm and died about 4 pm.’

 

Aged 20

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt. Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th December 1915.  John Douglas, E Social 1891.  Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

 

After leaving school, he went to Merton College, Oxford and then qualified as a barrister at Gray’s Inn. He spent some time in South Africa, and then went to Shanghai: ‘He was very popular in Shanghai, where he was known as “one of the best magistrates the Settlement ever had.” Latterly he had been in private practice as an advocate in the Supreme Court of China and Korea.’  He left Shanghai with a contingent of volunteers in 1914.

 

Aged 39

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds 18 December 1915

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt. Died of wounds 18 December 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

16th October 1915.  Roland Logan, E Social 1896.  Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

He was a career soldier who had served in the Second South African War in 1900.

Aged 33

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia 16 October 1915

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia 16 October 1915