Flanders & France (Western Front)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Humfrey Cole's grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' July 2015

Humfrey Cole’s grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Today we remember …

12th February 1917. Humfrey Cole, A Social 1910. 2nd Lt, Yorkshire Regiment

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

He went straight into the army from school, gazetted to the London Regiment in September 1915.

Aged 20

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

19th December 1916

Guy Boddington. F Social, 1906. Captain, 6th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. Missing.

Guy Boddington was last seen alive on 19th December, 1916. In March 1917, The Radleian magazine reported him as ‘wounded and probably a prisoner of war in German hands.’ He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial alongside all those others who have no known grave.

Before the War, he worked as a woollen merchant.

Aged 25

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

15th November 1916. Edwin Charrington. D Social, 1905. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After leaving school, Edwin Charrington started work for Union Insurance Society of Canton, in London, with the view of going out to China later. But after two years’ service he relinquished his position, and on the outbreak of the War obtained a commission in the Essex Regiment. He left for the Front on 14th February, 1915, returning to Britain at the end of May, badly wounded and disfigured. After a few months’ leave, he rejoined his regiment, and on 31st May, 1916 he again left for the Front.

His Colonel wrote: I had the greatest regard for him and a high opinion of his capabilities as an officer. He was beloved by all who knew him, and a most gallant officer and loyal friend, and he will be keenly missed by all ranks.

He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 25

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th BN, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th November, 1916. Vivian Fanning. G Social, 1911. Capt., 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After school, he went to Sandhurst to train for a military career. He received his commission in June 1915 and was promoted to Captain in June 1916. He went to the Front in August 1916. His colonel wrote to his father:

His captain had been killed, and he was commanding his company, which he did right well. I offer you the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers. We feel we have lost one of the best of comrades, and the men do too.

At his death, Vivian was the younger of two brothers. His father later married again and had a third son, Peter, born five years after Vivian’s death. Peter was killed in World War 2. A joint memorial to the brothers is outside Radley College Chapel.

Aged 19

Vivian Fanning.  Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia at Beaumont Hamel

Vivian Fanning. Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

18th October 1916. Arthur Evans. D Social, 1892. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action.

Arthur Evans came to Radley as a Junior Scholar. He won the James Scholarship, the Heathcote Scholarship, the Gibbs Scholarship and the English Literature Prize, became a Prefect, and played for the Soccer 1st XI and the Fives team. After school he won an Exhibition to Lincoln College, Oxford. He taught in prep schools for several years until the outbreak of the War. He then joined up as a member of the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment.) He later transferred to the Essex Regiment. He has no known grave so is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 38

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail - Warden & Prefects 1896

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail – Warden & Prefects 1896

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

12th October, 1916. William Marshall. A Social, 1910. 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. Killed in action at Gueudecourt.

William Marshall was a member of Radley’s first Rugby XV in 1914. After school, he went to Sandhurst, intending to follow a military career. He was slightly wounded in September 1916 and had not been back at the Front for long before he was killed at Gueudecourt.

Aged 19

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme