G Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Captain Hunt's grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain Hunt’s grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

12th April 1917

Claude Hunt, G Social 1901. Captain, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

After school, he worked on the Stock Exchange.  He emigrated to Canada in 1912.  He is listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as a Staff Captain, attached to XVIII Corps HQ, but this is not confirmed.  He was Mentioned in Despatches. He married in 1916.

Aged 30

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

4th April 1917

John Egerton-Leigh, G Social 1890. Captain, 10th Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action at Metz-en-Couture, during the German Retreat to the Hindenberg Line

He was a career soldier from 1897, serving in the Second South African War until 1902. He then went out to Canada as a farmer until the outbreak of WW1 in 1914.

He went to France in July 1915, and served on the Ypres Salient February to July, 1916, being wounded at Ypres. He afterwards served on the Somme, was at the taking of Guillemont, and was again wounded there, being mentioned in despatches January 4th, 1917. After he was wounded at Ypres he carried in his sergeant, who was also wounded. Finding him too heavy he came in for assistance. and went out again himself in spite of a very nasty rifle fire, and brought him in. He died leading his Company into action. After being wounded once he persevered until a bullet killed him outright. He was buried close to where he fell, just south of Metz-en-Couture and some ten miles from Cambrai.

Aged 41

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd April 1917

John O’Beirne, G Social 1907. Lt, 25th Sqn, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action on photographic reconnaissance

After school, he trained as a mining engineer. He had just finished his three years’ training at the School of Mining, Camborne, when war broke out. He joined the Special Reserve of Officers in September, 1915, and went to the front but was invalided home after the first battle of Ypres. Later he went to Sandhurst and received a commission in the regiment, joined the R.F.C., and went to the front in May, 1916.

Aged 23

His brother, Arthur, G Social 1901, was killed in July 1917

John O'Beirne, Lt, RFC.  kia April 1917

John O’Beirne, Lt, RFC. kia April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vivian Fanning at Munich Trench Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th November, 1916. Vivian Fanning. G Social, 1911. Capt., 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After school, he went to Sandhurst to train for a military career. He received his commission in June 1915 and was promoted to Captain in June 1916. He went to the Front in August 1916. His colonel wrote to his father:

His captain had been killed, and he was commanding his company, which he did right well. I offer you the deepest sympathy of all his brother officers. We feel we have lost one of the best of comrades, and the men do too.

At his death, Vivian was the younger of two brothers. His father later married again and had a third son, Peter, born five years after Vivian’s death. Peter was killed in World War 2. A joint memorial to the brothers is outside Radley College Chapel.

Aged 19

Vivian Fanning.  Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia at Beaumont Hamel

Vivian Fanning. Captain, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

10th October 1916. John Raikes. G Social, 1910. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action.

John Raikes was one of the most promising mathematicians to have been educated at Radley for many years. He came to the School as the Heathcote Mathematical Scholar and left it having won a Mathematical Exhibition to Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He joined up before he could take his place at Oxford.

As an athlete, he was a cross-country runner who ran second in the School mile:

He bore a spotless character, and he had a keen sense and appreciation of the humorous, and the recollection of the twinkle in his eye is abiding. On the intellectual side he deserves more than a passing notice. Besides helping his Social to gain the Croome casket in 1913, he must always be remembered with honour as being the first Radleian for very very many years to win a Mathematical distinction at the University. His future there was full of promise, but he at once answered his Country’s call and fell as a very gallant gentleman

Aged 20

 

His uncle, Frederick Raikes, died in Mesopotamia in 1917.

He was at Oxford Prep School and is commemorated on their War Memorial

John Raikes, 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

John Raikes, 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

7th October 1916. Walter Birch. G Social, 1905. Capt., 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Killed in action at Le Sars.

Walter Birch was a superb sportsman who represented the school at cricket, soccer and Fives. After Radley he went to Oriel College, Oxford. At the outbreak of the War he enlisted in the City of London Territorials. He obtained a commission in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 19I4. He went to France in May, 1915, but was wounded in the following August, losing the sight of one eye. He was mentioned in dispatches on January 1916. He went out to the Front again in September 1916.

His major wrote:

He was killed in action leading his company with the greatest gallantry. He was a fearless officer, and when he was shot he was right ahead of his company and leading them splendidly, and was a fine example. Just before reaching the German trench he was slightly hit by a machine-gun bullet and fell into a shell-hole. On attempting to rise a sniper must have seen him, and shot him in the head.

Aged 25

Walter Birch, Captain, 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia Battle of the Somme

Walter Birch, Captain, 6th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

13th September 1916

Richard Brodie-James. G Social, 1908. Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt.Killed in action in Greece.

Richard Brodie-James was killed near Macukovo in Greece. His name is recorded on the Doiran Memorial. He was Mentioned in Despatches. The letter from his colonel to his parents says:

Your son was as gallant, cool, and capable an officer as I have met in my 32 years’ soldiering. . . . He is a loss to the regiment and the Army, for his quickness and ability were much above the average. We were all proud of him, and the men speak of him enthusiastically. In the list of recommendations for recognition which I have just sent in your son’s name stands first. Living or dead he deserves the tribute – and more.

Aged 23

&

Henry Skinner. A Social, 1910. Private, 1/4th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme.

Henry Skinner was one of very few Radleians who enlisted as a Private.

He went from Radley to Abingdon School and from there to Jesus College, Cambridge, where his grandfather was a fellow.

Aged 21

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

21st July 1915. John Mowbray, DSO. H & D Socials, 1889. Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action.

At Radley, he rowed in the First VIII. After leaving school he trained as a civil engineer. He then changed career to become a soldier. He received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in July, 1900, and joined a battery in India. He was afterwards transferred to the Royal Horse Artillery, with which he remained until entering the Staff College, Quetta, in 1907. On passing out he was appointed to the General Staff at Simla, where he remained until 1913. He went to France as staff captain in August, 1914, and became brigade major on a divisional staff three months later. He resigned in the spring of 1916 in order to take command of a field battery. He was promoted captain in August, 1911, and major in December, 1914. For his services in France he was twice Mentioned in Dispatches and received the DSO.

Aged 41

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of the Somme

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th July 1915. Charles Wright. G Social, 1904. Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. Killed in action at Bazentin-le-Petit.

On leaving school he went to Hertford College, Oxford, where he entered as an exhibitioner in October, 1909. He achieved a third class in the Final Honour School of Modern History in 1913. He rowed in the Hertford Eight for three years, and in his third year was Captain of Boats and President of the College.

After leaving Oxford he went to teach at Earleywood School, Ascot. War was declared on 4th August 1914. Charles had already joined the Inns of Court OTC on 3rd August. He obtained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment on 24th September, 1914, and was gazetted captain in August of 1915.

Aged 25

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

First Battle of the Somme

 

3rd July 1916.  Lancelot Curteis, G Social, 1906.  2nd Lt, 8th Bn, Border Regt.  Killed in action, Battle of the Somme.

 

At school Lancelot Curteis played for the 1st XI Soccer team. He joined the University and Public Schools Corps in September, 1914. He obtained his commission in the Border Regiment in May, 1915, and went to France in December, 1915.

A letter from his Company Commander to his parents:

Your son was a splendid officer, and the men were simply devoted to him. He led them magnificently in our charge on the German trenches as steadily and coolly as on parade. He was shot soon after we had occupied them, fighting hard and cheerily to the last. The Commanding Officer had the greatest confidence in him. I have lost in him a personal friend, and a most efficient officer, who died, as he had lived, a very gallant gentleman.

Aged 23

& 

Duncan Tuck,  G Social, 1907.  Capt, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Died of wounds received on 17th June near Arras.

Duncan Tuck won a Scholarship to Radley. He went up to Hertford College, Oxford in 1912.

‘In May 1914, he joined the Special Reserve of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and after training at Portsmouth he was in March, 1915, attached to the 2nd Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, and was wounded in the right shoulder on April 23, when the regiment was supporting the left of the Canadians in the second battle of Ypres. Afterwards he was attached to the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, joining them on September 26, the day after they had lost many officers and men on the Menin road. He was six months in the dangerous Ypres salient, and then was moved to Arras. On June 17, while inspecting wire entanglements, he was hit in the chest and right arm when binding up the wounds of another officer.’

Aged 23

Lancelot Curteis, 2nd Lt, 8th bn Border Regt. kia 3 July 1916

Lancelot Curteis, 2nd Lt, 8th bn Border Regt. kia 3 July 1916

Duncan Tuck, Captain, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  Died of wounds 3 July 1916

Duncan Tuck, Captain, 3rd Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. Died of wounds 3 July 1916