Lieutenant

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Stephen Hiddingh's name on the Arras Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Stephen Hiddingh’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

3rd May 1917

Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, A Social 1911. Lieutenant, 4th Bn, Royal Fusiliers.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras

Stephen Hiddingh was brought up in Cape Town, South Africa.  He spent just one year at Radley before going to school in Neuchatel, Switzerland and then to Sandhurst in 1914.

He was in the fighting at Delville Wood last year, and came home invalided in August. He returned to the front in February, and was recommended for the D.S.O. “for marked gallantry and initiative” in April. His Colonel writes: ‘He led his company with the greatest gallantry; he was first wounded in the arm, but still continued on when I understand he was killed by machine gun fire.’ He was one of the very best officers in the battalion, and had already been recommended for special recognition and the D.S.O.

He was one of the bravest men I have ever met. … His company were devoted to him, and would have followed him anywhere.“

Aged 20

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The Butterworth Memorial in the Music School at Radley College. Designed by Laurence Whistler

The Butterworth Memorial in the Music School at Radley College. Designed by Laurence Whistler

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

20th September 1916. George Butterworth, MC. Don & Composer. Lt, 13th Bn, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action at Pozieres.

George Butterworth was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford, and from a very early age evinced great musical talent. One of his compositions was played at an Eton school concert while he was still a boy there. Among his musical publications are two cycles of songs from Housman’s “Shropshire Lad,” and an orchestral rhapsody, played at the last Leeds Festival, also at Queen’s Hall in the spring of 1914. He also devoted much time to the collection and arrangement of folk songs and folk dances in collaboration with Mr. Cecil Sharpe, and he took an active part in the formation and in the work of the Folk Dance Society. He contributed musical criticism to The Times intermittently for several years, and whatever he wrote showed shrewd judgment, sound knowledge, and independence of view. He was, in fact, a musician of great promise as well as a man of sterling character, who, if he had not given his life to a greater cause, would undoubtedly have done much to further a national ideal of musical art in this country. The Radleian

As a Don at Radley, he inspired a love of English pastoral music, reflected in the Music Society Minutes after he left. With Lance Vidal (kia 25 September 1915) he encouraged the boys to take up Morris dancing. He composed part of the Shropshire Lad Suite whilst at Radley.

Letter from his Commanding Officer to his father:

DEAR SIR ALEXANDER, I feel I must write you a note to tell you how deeply I grieve with you and yours for the loss of your gallant son. He was one of those quiet, unassuming men whose path did not appear naturally to be a military one, and I had watched him doing his duty quietly and conscientiously.

… Later we went into a line on the right of the Australians, S.E. of Pozieres.

Here we were about 450 yards from the Germans, and I gave orders to dig a trench within 200 yards of them so that we could attack with some chance of success.

This trench was dug in a fog, and was a very fine deep trench which saved many lives in the days to follow, and your son again superintended the work, and it was called Butterworth trench on all the official maps.

… Your son was in charge, and the trench was very much blown in and shallow, and I begged him to keep his head down. He was cheery and inspiring his tired men to secure the position which had been won earlier in the night. Within about a minute of my leaving him he was shot. I could ill afford to lose so fine a soldier…

Aged 31

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

13th September 1916

Richard Brodie-James. G Social, 1908. Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt.Killed in action in Greece.

Richard Brodie-James was killed near Macukovo in Greece. His name is recorded on the Doiran Memorial. He was Mentioned in Despatches. The letter from his colonel to his parents says:

Your son was as gallant, cool, and capable an officer as I have met in my 32 years’ soldiering. . . . He is a loss to the regiment and the Army, for his quickness and ability were much above the average. We were all proud of him, and the men speak of him enthusiastically. In the list of recommendations for recognition which I have just sent in your son’s name stands first. Living or dead he deserves the tribute – and more.

Aged 23

&

Henry Skinner. A Social, 1910. Private, 1/4th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme.

Henry Skinner was one of very few Radleians who enlisted as a Private.

He went from Radley to Abingdon School and from there to Jesus College, Cambridge, where his grandfather was a fellow.

Aged 21

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th June 1916.  Cecil Draper,  F Social, 1908.  Lt, 1st Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.  He left school in 1910 to attend Sandhurst.

Cecil Draper’s stepfather, Frederick Wells, also a Radleian, also died on active service on the Western Front. Both are recorded on the War Memorial. Cecil’s mother, Frederick’s widow, was widowed three times before she was 45, and was left to bring up five sons. The family did not send photos for the War Memorial albums.

 

Aged 22

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Hind at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Hind at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

30th May 1916.  Charles Hind,  B Social, 1907.  Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.
At Radley he was Head of B Social and Captain of Cricket.  After leaving school he planned to become a doctor. As a medical student he had almost completed two years’ study at Pembroke College, Cambridge, when the war began. He took a commission in the South Staffords, and throughout 1915 he had commanded a brigade grenade company in France. He was mentioned in despatches. 

Aged 22

Charles Hind, Lt, 2nd Bn South Staffordshire Regt.  kia 19 May 1916

Charles Hind, Lt, 2nd Bn South Staffordshire Regt. kia 19 May 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Geoffrey Graves at Menin Rd South Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

18th March 1916.  Geoffrey Graves, E Social, 1907.  Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles, (Saskatchewan Regiment)  Canadian Expeditionary ForceKilled in action in an unknown engagement at Hooge.  Geoffrey Graves has no obituary in The Radleian.  He left Radley in 1910 after just three years.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists him as ‘An intelligence officer’. We have no further information.  Aged 22

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles.  kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Geoffrey Graves, Lt, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. kia at Hooge 18 March 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Albert Lane-Joynt, Guards Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Albert Lane-Joynt, Guards Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

26th February 1916.  Albert Lane-Joynt, B Social 1909.  Lt, Machine Gun Corps.  Killed by a sniper in France.  Albert Lane-Joynt played for the Cricket XI in 1913, and joined Surrey CC after leaving school. He is commemorated on the War Memorial at Kennington Oval.  He was a cricket aficionado who wrote magazine articles, and immediately on leaving school produced his first issue of the Public Schools Cricket Year Book.

 

A history of Radley cricket, by AW Lane-Joynt, 1914: … ‘the three best cricket Xl’s turned out by Radley were those of 1867, 1888, and 1913. … The 1913 side had the estimable advantage of a really good captain in O. A. Reid. He was a fine hard-hitting consistent bat and scored 101 (not out) in 80 minutes against Bradfield. His wicket-keeping was better than ever and when he bowled he was certainly the best bowler on the side. Both he and R. C. Keller had averages of 40; with the latter he bore the brunt of the season’s work. Keller is a really fine player with a beautiful cut, and should be heard of in the future.  Reid was asked to play in the Public Schools Trial match at Lords… and was eventually chosen as first change bowler for the Public Schools XI.  Expert opinion unanimously placed our team high among the school sides of 1913, and there could be no more fitting place to end this brief resume of Radley Cricket.’

[OA Reid won the VC in Mesopotamia in 1917. He died at Johannesburg in 1920. RC Keller served in France 1915-1917, was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps, was shot down and ended WW1 as a POW. ]

 

Aged 20

Lt Albert Lane-Joynt, Machine Gun Corps.  kia 26 February 1916

Lt Albert Lane-Joynt, Machine Gun Corps. kia 26 February 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

23rd February 1916.  William Wigan, E Social 1909.  Lt, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of shrapnel wounds near Ypres.   He went to Sandhurst in September 1914. 

‘ …. He was in a dug-out two and a half miles behind the firing line, with his Captain and two other subs., when a shell dropped in Battalion Commander’s Headquarters some six yards behind them. The Captain who was nearest the door went out to see what had happened and the other three must have started to follow him when another shell dropped right in the doorway wounding all three. The Captain writes: ‘I went to the dug-out to see what I could do, but your son, who looked very pale. though quite calm, waved me away, saying: “Get away, you are the only one left in the Company.” I then sent for stretcher-bearers and doctor: your son then asked for a cigarette which I gave him and lit it for him. The stretcher-bearers, four in number, then went to him, but he said, ‘Look to the others who are worse first, I shall be all right, I have got one leg broken, and am hit through the other.’ …. As I walked with him he said, ‘ Don’t look so worried about me, I shall be all right; shall see you at home.’  I then had to leave him to take my men to the trenches.

As I said good-bye to him he blew me a kiss and wished me good luck… I cannot tell you how much we valued and loved him, what a good hard-working officer he was… He was beloved of all the men of the Company, who realised his efforts for them. and what a good hard-working officer he was. . . always cheery, courageous, and energetic. . . He was taken suddenly worse on the morning of the 23rd, became unconscious about 2 pm and died about 4 pm.’

 

Aged 20

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt. Died of wounds 23 February 1916