Major

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

14th May 1917

Alfred Mark Wardlaw, G Social 1881. Major, 9th Bn, Royal Sussex Regt.  Died at home in Sussex as a result of wounds sustained in March 1917

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Soccer XI and rowed for the VIII.  After school, he became a career soldier with the Royal Sussex Regiment, achieving the rank of Captain.  He retired in 1900.  He returned to active service in 1914, with the rank of Acting Major.

He married Alfreda, daughter of Major-General Chapman in 1894.  She died in 1914.  He added the surname ‘Wardlaw’ to his family name of ‘Mark’ in 1895.

His ashes are in Golders Green Crematorium. His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 49

The shield of AP Mark (aft. Wardlaw) in Radley College Hall

About Radley College’s Prefects Shields

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th February 1917. John Crichton, A Social 1897. Major, Hampshire Regt, attached Royal Engineers, Inland Water Transport. Died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Soccer XI. After school, he took up marine engineering as a career, having served his apprenticeship at Thornycroft’s. He took the degree of A.M.I.C.E. at King’s College, London. He then served his time as engineer on board the Royal Mail Company’s ships for three years, which enabled him to qualify for a chief engineer’s certificate. He joined the Hampshire Regiment at the inception of the Territorial movement, and on the outbreak of war proceeded with his battalion to India, where he served as major of his battalion till the summer of 1916, when he was specially sent by the Indian Government to the front to carry out important marine constructional work.

More men died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign than were killed in action. He is buried in Basra.

Aged 34

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th September 1916. Alfred Benson. F Social, 1880. Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on active service in the bombing of Scarborough.

Alfred Benson was a career soldier, serving as a surgeon with the RAMC. He served throughout the South African War. He was wounded at Johannesburg while attached to the Gordon Highlanders. He received the Queen’s medal with five clasps and the King’s medal with two clasps and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener’s dispatches. Already retired, at the outbreak of the War Major Benson volunteered for service, and for eight months was in France, and then with the Home Forces. He left a widow, a daughter, and a son who was also serving in France.

The bombing of Scarborough was the first attack on a civilian target on mainland Britain.

Aged 52

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

19th September 1916. Ronald Rose-Lloyd. F Social, 1898. Major, King’s African Rifles. Killed in action in East Africa (now Tanzania).

Ronald Rose-Lloyd was a career soldier who joined the Army immediately upon leaving school. He came 1st in his year in the Military Competitive Exam in 1906 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1907. He was serving in East Africa when the War began, and then attached to the King’s African Rifles. He was Mentioned in Despatches.

He is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

Aged 32

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King's African Rifles. kia East Africa

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King’s African Rifles. kia East Africa

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

24th July 1916. Lesley Douglas-Hamilton. A Social, 1896. Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action.

He was a career soldier whose original commission was in the Cameron Highlanders in September, 1901. He was promoted to Captain in 1905.  He served in the last year of the 2nd South African War and elsewhere in the colonies. He was awarded the Queen’s Medal with five clasps.

As a serving soldier, when the War began he was transferred from his original regiment and given a commission as a Major with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

Aged 35

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

21st July 1915. John Mowbray, DSO. H & D Socials, 1889. Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action.

At Radley, he rowed in the First VIII. After leaving school he trained as a civil engineer. He then changed career to become a soldier. He received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in July, 1900, and joined a battery in India. He was afterwards transferred to the Royal Horse Artillery, with which he remained until entering the Staff College, Quetta, in 1907. On passing out he was appointed to the General Staff at Simla, where he remained until 1913. He went to France as staff captain in August, 1914, and became brigade major on a divisional staff three months later. He resigned in the spring of 1916 in order to take command of a field battery. He was promoted captain in August, 1911, and major in December, 1914. For his services in France he was twice Mentioned in Dispatches and received the DSO.

Aged 41

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of the Somme

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th December 1915.  John Douglas, E Social 1891.  Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

 

After leaving school, he went to Merton College, Oxford and then qualified as a barrister at Gray’s Inn. He spent some time in South Africa, and then went to Shanghai: ‘He was very popular in Shanghai, where he was known as “one of the best magistrates the Settlement ever had.” Latterly he had been in private practice as an advocate in the Supreme Court of China and Korea.’  He left Shanghai with a contingent of volunteers in 1914.

 

Aged 39

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds 18 December 1915

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt. Died of wounds 18 December 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th November 1915.  Henry Napier, A Social 1890.  Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded in the Battle of Loos. Drowned in the sinking of the hospital ship HMS Anglia.

 

HMS Anglia hit a German mine just outside Dover. The majority of the wounded and nursing staff were lost. The steamer Lusitania, which came to her aid, was also destroyed by a mine after launching life boats to help save the personnel on the Anglia.

 

Henry Napier had retired from active service in 1909. He was recalled to the Sherwood Foresters in 1914.  Aged 39

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters. Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915