Marching in Memory for Combat Stress July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, June 2015

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

7th June 1917

Laurence Garnett, G Social 1905. Lt, 100th Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Battle of Messines Ridge

He played for the Cricket and Soccer XIs and represented the school at fencing.  He went to Brasenose College, Oxford.  In 1912, he emigrated to Canada, but returned on the outbreak of the War.

His elder brother was killed at Kut-el-Amara in 1915.

Aged 26

AND

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Eric Lambert, MC, D Social 1896. Lt, 8th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer X1s.  After school, from 1904-9, he worked as a merchant with companies in Yokohama and Kobe, Japan, and then in electrical engineering in Kobe from 1910.

Aged 34

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

24th May 1917

Charles Wilson, MC, F Social 1900. 2nd Lt, 88th Cpy, Machine Gun Corps.  Killed in an unknown engagement

At school he was Head of F Social and Captain of Boats. After school, he went to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he rowed for the University, and then worked for the Dublin Stock Exchange.

Captain of the Boats at Radley, he rowed in the famous Pembroke College Eight of 1906; he also rowed in the Oxford Trial Eights in 1907. In 1912-13 he was Captain of the Lansdowne Football Club. In January, 1916, he was gazetted to the 6th Royal Munster Fusiliers from the Dublin University O.T.C., and went to the front in September, 1916. Later on he joined the Machine Gun Corps, and won the Military Cross, April 23rd, 1917. His Major writes of him : – ” His loss is very keenly felt by us, as he had become such a favourite amongst us all. He had just been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in action on April 23rd. He was a splendid officer and a loyal and brave comrade.” Another officer writes of him :- He was one of the very best, cool and cheery in danger, and although I personally only knew him for the short period of two months, still I and all the officers, N.C.O.’s and men of the Company, learned to esteem and respect him as an example of the finest type of a soldier and gentleman. Such men as he are hard to replace, and his section would have followed him anywhere and done anything for him.’

Citation for the Military Cross He maintained control of his guns throughout the whole operations in a very effective manner. He inflicted severe losses on the enemy, and his coolness and determination was a splendid example to all.

Aged 31

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps.  kia 24th May 1917

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps. kia 24th May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

19th May 1917

William Lloyd, A Social 1907. 2nd Lt, 40th Bde, Royal Field Artillery.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras.

He worked for the newly emerging car industry at the Daimler Factory in Coventry from 1911. Early in 1915 he joined the Royal Horse Artillery, and went through the Somme fighting in the ranks. He was recommended for a commission, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in February 1917.  He was killed by a German shell.

Aged 23

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of Arras

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Arras

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Charles Waddilove at Tilloy les Moufflaines.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Charles Waddilove at Tilloy les Moufflaines. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

4th May 1917

Charles Waddilove, G Social 1896. Private, 2/3rd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps

He was a stretcher-bearer who was reported killed sometime between 1st and 5th May 1917.

After school, he went to Exeter College, Oxford.  He then worked for Oxford House, Bethnal Green and Toynbee Hall, both committed to working with the urban poor.  He is one of 28 men commemorated on the War Memorial at Oxford House.

Oxford House was established in 1884 as the first “settlement house” to open where students and graduates from Keble College, Oxford undertook a period of residential volunteering to learn first-hand about the realities of urban poverty. These volunteers were either graduates or worked locally and lived upstairs in Oxford House which was like a mini Oxford college in the heart of Bethnal Green. Volunteers provided practical support to alleviate or remove the impact of poverty to the local community by creating projects such as youth clubs, poor man’s lawyer, labour exchanges and adult education classes.

Aged 35

Private Charles Waddilove, Stretcher bearer, RAMC. kia Battle of Arras

Private Charles Waddilove, Stretcher bearer, RAMC. kia Battle of Arras

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Stephen Hiddingh's name on the Arras Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Stephen Hiddingh’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

3rd May 1917

Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, A Social 1911. Lieutenant, 4th Bn, Royal Fusiliers.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras

Stephen Hiddingh was brought up in Cape Town, South Africa.  He spent just one year at Radley before going to school in Neuchatel, Switzerland and then to Sandhurst in 1914.

He was in the fighting at Delville Wood last year, and came home invalided in August. He returned to the front in February, and was recommended for the D.S.O. “for marked gallantry and initiative” in April. His Colonel writes: ‘He led his company with the greatest gallantry; he was first wounded in the arm, but still continued on when I understand he was killed by machine gun fire.’ He was one of the very best officers in the battalion, and had already been recommended for special recognition and the D.S.O.

He was one of the bravest men I have ever met. … His company were devoted to him, and would have followed him anywhere.“

Aged 20

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

29th April, 1917

Barham Middleton, B Social 1899. Lance-Corporal, 22nd Bn, Royal Fusiliers.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras.

After school, he studied at the Agricultural Department at Reading University, then worked as a dairy farmer in Surrey. He signed up and served in the ranks of the Universities and Public Schools Battalion, Royal Fusiliers in 1914.  He was killed in the Battle of Arras but has no grave, so is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

Aged 35

Barham Middleton's name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Barham Middleton’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

21st April 1917

Lewis Sheppard. B Social 1910. Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in a flying accident

Lewis Sheppard left Radley in 1914 to join up as a 2nd Lt in the Somerset Light Infantry. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916.

He was a boy of more than average ability. A great talker and with many interests, he has left his mark, though he was not here long enough to become distinguished. He joined the Flying Corps and was killed on April 21 by an accident on his way back to the advanced base in Flanders.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Captain Hunt's grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain Hunt’s grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

12th April 1917

Claude Hunt, G Social 1901. Captain, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

After school, he worked on the Stock Exchange.  He emigrated to Canada in 1912.  He is listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as a Staff Captain, attached to XVIII Corps HQ, but this is not confirmed.  He was Mentioned in Despatches. He married in 1916.

Aged 30

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Humfrey Cole's grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' July 2015

Humfrey Cole’s grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Today we remember …

12th February 1917. Humfrey Cole, A Social 1910. 2nd Lt, Yorkshire Regiment

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

He went straight into the army from school, gazetted to the London Regiment in September 1915.

Aged 20

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme