mentioned in despatches

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

19th September 1916. Ronald Rose-Lloyd. F Social, 1898. Major, King’s African Rifles. Killed in action in East Africa (now Tanzania).

Ronald Rose-Lloyd was a career soldier who joined the Army immediately upon leaving school. He came 1st in his year in the Military Competitive Exam in 1906 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1907. He was serving in East Africa when the War began, and then attached to the King’s African Rifles. He was Mentioned in Despatches.

He is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

Aged 32

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King's African Rifles. kia East Africa

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King’s African Rifles. kia East Africa

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

13th September 1916

Richard Brodie-James. G Social, 1908. Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt.Killed in action in Greece.

Richard Brodie-James was killed near Macukovo in Greece. His name is recorded on the Doiran Memorial. He was Mentioned in Despatches. The letter from his colonel to his parents says:

Your son was as gallant, cool, and capable an officer as I have met in my 32 years’ soldiering. . . . He is a loss to the regiment and the Army, for his quickness and ability were much above the average. We were all proud of him, and the men speak of him enthusiastically. In the list of recommendations for recognition which I have just sent in your son’s name stands first. Living or dead he deserves the tribute – and more.

Aged 23

&

Henry Skinner. A Social, 1910. Private, 1/4th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme.

Henry Skinner was one of very few Radleians who enlisted as a Private.

He went from Radley to Abingdon School and from there to Jesus College, Cambridge, where his grandfather was a fellow.

Aged 21

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Richard Brodie-James, Lt, 9th Bn, East Lancashire Regt. kia in Greece

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Henry Skinner, Private, 1/14th Bn, London Scottish. Died of wounds, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

9th September 1916. Arthur Clarke. E Social, 1905. 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. Killed in action at High Wood.

Arthur Clarke’s story exemplifies the horror and confusion of the 1st Battle of the Somme.   He was reported wounded but missing in October, 1916. By June, 1917 this had been amended to ‘believed to have been killed on 9th September 1916.’ His body was recovered and is buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval.

After school, he went to Christ Church, Oxford. When the War broke out he was in Switzerland, unable to return to England until early in September, 1914. When he did get back he immediately enlisted in the North Somerset Yeomanry. He went to the Western Front in October, 1914, and took part in the first battle of Ypres. In February, 1915, he was given a commission and after three months’ training in England rejoined his regiment at the front. He was wounded on 25th September, 1915, in the Battle of Loos, and, after six months’ sick leave, rejoined his regiment. He was slightly wounded on June 27th, 1916, but was able to return to duty after a few weeks in hospital.

He was Mentioned in Dispatches twice.

Aged 25

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Robinson, JY Shield NU4croppedToday we remember …

Mesopotamia Campaign

23rd August 1916. John Robinson, MC. A Social, 1899. Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt.. Died of wounds received in the Battle of El Hannah, Mesopotamia (now Iraq).

John Robinson was one of the most distinguished Radleians to die in the War. At school he played for the Cricket and Football XIs and was Head of A Social. After school, he went to Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated with honours in history. He played Hockey for Oxford University for four years, became an international player and went on to win Gold for Great Britain at the 1908 Olympics.

After leaving university he became a schoolmaster. He enlisted in an OTC immediately War was declared, receiving his commission in September 1914. He served in the Gallipoli Campaign. He was Mentioned in Dispatches and awarded the Military Cross in February, 1916. The same month he was sent to Mesopotamia. He was wounded in the spine in April and died from the injury in August 1916.

His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 31

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of John Mowbray at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

21st July 1915. John Mowbray, DSO. H & D Socials, 1889. Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action.

At Radley, he rowed in the First VIII. After leaving school he trained as a civil engineer. He then changed career to become a soldier. He received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in July, 1900, and joined a battery in India. He was afterwards transferred to the Royal Horse Artillery, with which he remained until entering the Staff College, Quetta, in 1907. On passing out he was appointed to the General Staff at Simla, where he remained until 1913. He went to France as staff captain in August, 1914, and became brigade major on a divisional staff three months later. He resigned in the spring of 1916 in order to take command of a field battery. He was promoted captain in August, 1911, and major in December, 1914. For his services in France he was twice Mentioned in Dispatches and received the DSO.

Aged 41

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of the Somme

John Mowbray, Major, 41st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Hind at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Hind at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

30th May 1916.  Charles Hind,  B Social, 1907.  Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.
At Radley he was Head of B Social and Captain of Cricket.  After leaving school he planned to become a doctor. As a medical student he had almost completed two years’ study at Pembroke College, Cambridge, when the war began. He took a commission in the South Staffords, and throughout 1915 he had commanded a brigade grenade company in France. He was mentioned in despatches. 

Aged 22

Charles Hind, Lt, 2nd Bn South Staffordshire Regt.  kia 19 May 1916

Charles Hind, Lt, 2nd Bn South Staffordshire Regt. kia 19 May 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

19th March 1916.  Mervyn Richardson, D Social, 1908.  Capt, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement.‘Tracker’ Richardson was one of the young officers mentioned in Siegfried Sassoon’s diary, which became his fictional Memoirs of a fox-hunting man. At Radley he was Captain of the Boats, and rowed twice at Henley in the Ladies’ Plate, rowing No. 6 in the winning heat v. University College, Oxford, in 1912. He was a member of the Leander Club. After leaving school, he attended Sandhurst, then went straight out to the Western Front in 1915. He was Mentioned in Despatches.  A letter from the Regimental Chaplain to his parents describes the scene of his funeral:CHAPLAIN’S LETTER, March 22 (Wed.).

DEAR SIR,-You might care I think to know the details of your son’s burial and last resting place from the Chaplain of the Regiment?… Your son was the most gallant and best loved of a gallant band of young officers… I have been with the battalion a year, and through more than one action, yet I do not remember so solemn a funeral or such real quiet grief. It took place on Tuesday night at 9.45. The little burial ground lies in a slight hollow only 100 yards behind the front lines. The nearest village is Reanite, near Albert, but from there it is a walk of two miles over rolling chalk downs to the line. The little plot is reverently tended, and a cross already in position on the grave. At the end of the war you will find no difficulty in finding it and tending it as you like.

As we left the dug-outs for the cemetery, two canisters burst quite near with a deafening roar. There in the darkness I took the service. All the officers were present and many men. The moon came out in the middle, and shone on the grey steel helmets of the group, and made the colours of the Union Jack that lay on the body gleam. The service ended, to the roar of another German canister, more suitable perhaps to the occasion than any organ.

Eric Milner-White

Aged 22

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died of wounds 19 March 1916