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Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

12th February 1916.  Gordon Rennie, G Social 1902.  Captain, 6th South African Infantry, South African Forces. Killed in action at Salaita Hill, British East Africa (now Kenya).

Gordon Rennie was born in Durban, Natal, SA. After school he worked as a shipping agent between London and Durban. He married Marion Steele in 1913.

 

‘Rennie took two trenches by assault, but came under such heavy cross maxim fire that he could not move. We stuck it for three hours, when the order came to retire. Rennie was mortally wounded and unconscious, and Burke took over “A” Company. All our wounded and killed, as far as possible, had to be got back. Poor Rennie and others had to be carried over three miles. The gunners on our side were wonderfully good, but the enemy were so numerous we could not check them, and all the time we were under a murderous fire. We expected an attack which mercifully did not come. The officers placed poor Gordon Rennie in his grave, and the Durban Light Infantry fellows lay beside him. Our chaplain was wounded earlier in the day, and Col. Molyneux said the burial service just at dusk. We could fire no volley, but the boom of the guns was his requiem. He is a heavy loss. All through he had done excellently, and no one could have done more than he. There is hardly a dry eye in his Company.’

Aged 28

Captain Gordon Rennie, 6th South African Infrantry.  kia 12 February 1916 in British East Africa (Kenya)

Captain Gordon Rennie, 6th South African Infrantry. kia 12 February 1916 in British East Africa (Kenya)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of John Hermon-Hodge at Rifle House Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of John Hermon-Hodge at Rifle House Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

28th May 1915. John Hermon-Hodge, F Social 1904.  2nd Lt, 1/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry. Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.He worked for a cotton merchant in Liverpool between 1909 and 1914. He was one of seven brothers who all served in the army or navy during WW1. His brother, Guy, fell in the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

Aged 24

John Hermon-Hodge, 2nd Lt, 1/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. KIA 28 May 1915

John Hermon-Hodge, 2nd Lt, 1/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. KIA 28 May 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

30 October 1914. Today we remember two Radleians who fell in the First Battle of Ypres:  Spencer Railston and Roger Schunck.

Spencer Railston, G Social 1902. Lt, 4th Irish Dragoon Guards

Railston ‘lost his life in a gallant attempt to bring in a wounded peasant woman, who in very heavy village fighting had got between the British and the German lines. Lieut. Railston left his cover to do this, and was immediately killed by many bullets from a Maxim battery.’

‘He was at home on leave from India when war was declared, and got attached to the 4th Dragoon Guards. He received his commission in 1907. and his step in 1909.    He was one of the many good all-round sportsmen who have given their lives for their country-a very fine horseman, a good polo player, and big game shot, and at one time champion light-weight boxer of India.’ (Radleian obituary)

Spencer Railston, Lt, 4th Bn, Irish Dragoon Guards. kia 1st Battle of Ypres, 30 October 1914

Spencer Railston, Lt, 4th Bn, Irish Dragoon Guards. kia 1st Battle of Ypres, 30 October 1914

Roger Schunck, 2nd Lt, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 1st Battle of Ypres, 30 October 1914

Roger Schunck, 2nd Lt, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 1st Battle of Ypres, 30 October 1914

Roger Schunck, G Social 1898. 2nd Lt, Royal West Surrey Regt. Killed in action near Gheluvelt. At school he played for the Soccer XI.  After school he became a merchant with his family’s firm in Manchester
The grave of Roger Schunck in Ypres Town Cemetery.  Photgraphed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Roger Schunck in Ypres Town Cemetery. Photgraphed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015