missing

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

19th December 1916

Guy Boddington. F Social, 1906. Captain, 6th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. Missing.

Guy Boddington was last seen alive on 19th December, 1916. In March 1917, The Radleian magazine reported him as ‘wounded and probably a prisoner of war in German hands.’ He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial alongside all those others who have no known grave.

Before the War, he worked as a woollen merchant.

Aged 25

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Arthur Clarke in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

9th September 1916. Arthur Clarke. E Social, 1905. 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. Killed in action at High Wood.

Arthur Clarke’s story exemplifies the horror and confusion of the 1st Battle of the Somme.   He was reported wounded but missing in October, 1916. By June, 1917 this had been amended to ‘believed to have been killed on 9th September 1916.’ His body was recovered and is buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval.

After school, he went to Christ Church, Oxford. When the War broke out he was in Switzerland, unable to return to England until early in September, 1914. When he did get back he immediately enlisted in the North Somerset Yeomanry. He went to the Western Front in October, 1914, and took part in the first battle of Ypres. In February, 1915, he was given a commission and after three months’ training in England rejoined his regiment at the front. He was wounded on 25th September, 1915, in the Battle of Loos, and, after six months’ sick leave, rejoined his regiment. He was slightly wounded on June 27th, 1916, but was able to return to duty after a few weeks in hospital.

He was Mentioned in Dispatches twice.

Aged 25

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Arthur Clarke, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Northamptonshire Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

18th August 1916. Aubrey Patch. C Social, 1899. 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. Killed in action.

After school he went to study at Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto. When war broke out he immediately returned to England from Canada to enlist, and served in the ranks for about a year.  He received his commission in October 1915. He was killed while leading his platoon against a German trench.

Aged 30

Aubrey Patch, 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Aubrey Patch, 2nd Lt, 3rd Bn, Royal Lancaster Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

27th July 1916. Edwin (Edward) Mattingley. College Staff. Private, 1st Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  Missing in action.

Edwin Mattingley was born in Radley village in 1893. He came to work for the College as a gardener’s boy at the age of 15. By 1914, he was employed as a footman. He enlisted on 11th August, 1914. He took part in the Battles of Festubert and Loos in 1915, and was granted his first seven days leave on 18th May 1916.

At 2am on the morning of 27th July, 1916, his battalion moved into its forward trenches at Delville Wood. At 5.10am the British Artillery began to bombard the German positions at Longueval Village. The Berkshires advanced 270 yards and began to dig in. German forces began to shell the British troops with high explosives and sniper fire. Outnumbered and short of ammunition the British troops had to scavenge the captured trenches for munitions. The new line held against counter attacks and German shelling began to decline by 17.00 hours, all quiet by 21.30. Sometime during this action, Edwin was lost. On his service sheet, the officer recorded: ‘missing after action 27th July 1916.’ After the War returning comrades said that he had last been seen returning into no-man’s land to rescue a wounded comrade.

Edwin was described as 5 feet 2 inches tall, 128 lbs in weight with hazel eyes, light brown hair and a 36 inch chest. He was aged 25 when he died, so this is a good description of the average British tommy. Two of his brothers also served. Both survived. (Information from ‘Gone for a soldier’ by MBJ Mawhinney, for Radley History Club)

Edwin Mattingley, c1916. Copyright Radley History Club

Edwin Mattingley, c1916. Copyright Radley History Club

Edwin Mattingley, Private, 1st bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. Missing in action, Battle of the Somme

Edwin Mattingley, Private, 1st bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. Missing in action, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

This must be considered the darkest day in the history of Radley College. Eleven men from the College fell on this one day during the Battle of Loos and an unknown number were wounded. Many of the men were volunteers in Kitchener’s New Army, so the list of the Fallen includes young men from Radley village who had worked for the College and the first serving schoolmaster to be killed.

Although the long-drawn out campaigns of Gallipoli, the First Battle of the Somme, the Third Battle of Ypres (Paschendaele) claimed more lives overall, 25th September must stand forever as a day of mourning.

Lancelot Vidal, Schoolmaster, Tutor of A Social.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Reported missing, believed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘For days, even weeks, we entertained hopes that the news might be false, but eight weeks have now elapsed, and we can now only fear the worst.  He was last seen in the German trenches in the attack on Sept. 25th. when in charge of a machine gun … it has since been learnt that he was killed by a shell whilst pushing forward with his section in the early morning of September 25.’

Lance Vidal was the first serving schoolmaster of Radley College to fall in the Great War. He volunteered in 1914, having held the post of Tutor of A Social for two weeks. He was a popular Don at Radley and was one of those instrumental in introducing and promoting rugby football as the school’s major sport. He had played for Harlequins before joining Radley. He was also Master in Charge of Cricket.

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Arthur Egerton on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress

The name of Arthur Egerton on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Arthur Egerton,  F Social 1904.  2nd Lt, 5th Bn, Shropshire Light Infantry.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

He was still listed as missing in April 1916

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

Richard Dundas, D Social 1882.  Lt-Col commanding, 11th Bn, The Royal Scots.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos, along with most of his battalion. ‘His magnificent and heroic leadership at Loos will never be forgotten, and his loss there cannot be too much deplored. His was a great personality and attractive nature, absolutely just and true, unfailing in sympathy and courtesy to all, untiring in work, an ideal soldier, with the keenest of brains, who jealously guarded the honour and traditions of the regiment that he loved, lived, and died for, and to which his loss is irreparable.” The Times.

He was a career soldier whose family had served in the regiment since 1670. Like Cecil Palmer (killed at Gallipoli) he had come out of retirement to command one of the newly formed battalions.

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots.  Missing 25 September 1915

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots. Missing 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

10th August 1915.  Robert Wilson, A Social 1906.  Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt.  Killed in action at Chunuk Bair, Gallipoli  23rd October 1915.  ‘At Radley he was a prefect, and was a member of the football eleven of 1910, and the cricket eleven of 1911. On leaving Radley he went up to Exeter College, Oxford. Reported missing;  28th October 1916;  Reported missing 27th October 1917;  Previously reported missing, now presumed killed on 10th August 1915.’ Aged 23

Robert Wilson, Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt.  Missing 10 August 1915

Robert Wilson, Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt. Missing 10 August 1915

Robert Wilson commemorated on the Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Robert Wilson commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of John Wheen on the Le Touret Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of John Wheen on the Le Touret Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

14th May 1915.  Today we remember two Radleians who fell, one in France, the other the first Australian Radleian to fall at Gallipoli. John Wheen, E Social 1894. Captain, 1st Bn, Liverpool Regt. Missing, presumed killed in action, Battle of Festubert (part of the 2nd Battle of Ypres).  He served in the Second South African War in 1900 and was invalided home wounded. He was wounded in France in 1914‘previously reported wounded and missing, is now officially presumed to have been killed on May 14-16, 1915.’

John Wheen, Capt 1st Bn Liverpool Regt.  Missing, presumed kia, 14 May 1915

John Wheen, Capt 1st Bn Liverpool Regt. Missing, presumed kia, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force.  kia Gallipoli, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. kia Gallipoli, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, A Social 1894. Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. Killed in action, 14-15 May, at Gallipoli.  Originally from Essex, he emigrated to Australia and became a farmer

The grave of A Maryon-Wilson at Shrapnel Valley.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The grave of A Maryon-Wilson at Shrapnel Valley. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery is close to ANZAC Cove.  Grave of A Maryon-Wilson in foreground.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery is close to ANZAC Cove. Grave of A Maryon-Wilson in foreground. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Lionel Johnston on the Le Touret Memorial. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Lionel Johnston on the Le Touret Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

JL Johnstone. Prefects 1904

JL Johnstone. Prefects 1904

On 12th May 1915 John Leslie Johnston, B Social 1899. Lt, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, was recorded as missing, presumed killed in action in an unknown engagement in the 2nd Battle of Ypres. He was one of the most distinguished scholars of his time at Radley. He won the Richards Gold Medal, the James, Heathcote and Gibbs Scholarships. He went on to become Fellow and Dean of Magdalen College, Oxford. His friend, Edwyn Bevan, published a biography of him in 1920.‘He vanished in May 1915 and it is very likely that he was executed by the Germans soon after being shot in the abdomen.’ Letter from Dr Simon Harris, Regimental Historian, 2014

Lt JL Johnstone, Ox & Bucks LI. Missing in action, 12 May 1915

Lt JL Johnstone, Ox & Bucks LI. Missing in action, 12 May 1915