Schoolmaster

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

3rd February 1917.  John Partington. B Social 1898. Captain, 4th Bn, Devonshire Regt.. Killed in action, Second Battle of Kut-el-Amara, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

‘He went up to Pembroke College, Cambridge, with an exhibition in 1903, and took honours in the Classical Tripos in 1907. At the outbreak of war he was Classical Master at St. Edward’s School, Oxford, and received his commission in the Devons in October, 1914. He was promoted temporary captain in December, 1914, and went out at that time with his battalion to India. During 1915 he was sent to Australia on special service, returning to India in the autumn of that year.  In October, 1916, he was transferred to another front, and fell in action on February 3.’

Aged 32

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

 

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

11th November, 1916

William Hall. Schoolmaster. Chaplain & Naval Instructor, HMS Venerable, Royal Navy. Died on active service.

William Hall taught maths at Radley for just one year in 1889-90. He then taught at Rossall School until 1893, when he left to take Holy Orders. He served as Chaplain and Instructor to the Royal Navy from 1894 until his death on active service in 1916. He was a distinguished mathematician who had graduated as 2nd Wrangler from Cambridge University (King’s College). His naval career utilised his maths and he was the author of several books on navigation: Ex-Meridian Altitude Tables, Modern Navigation, Model Sights, Tables and Constants, and lnman’s Nautical Tables. He was seconded to the Ottoman Navy in 1910 and to the Australian Royal Navy in 1912. He served in the Endymion and the Astraea (1895-98), in the Raleigh (1899), St George (1899-1902), London (1902-4), Aurora (1904-5), Highflyer (1905-6), Britannia (1906-09), and the Collingwood (1911) before his final posting to the Venerable.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

18th October 1916. Arthur Evans. D Social, 1892. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action.

Arthur Evans came to Radley as a Junior Scholar. He won the James Scholarship, the Heathcote Scholarship, the Gibbs Scholarship and the English Literature Prize, became a Prefect, and played for the Soccer 1st XI and the Fives team. After school he won an Exhibition to Lincoln College, Oxford. He taught in prep schools for several years until the outbreak of the War. He then joined up as a member of the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment.) He later transferred to the Essex Regiment. He has no known grave so is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 38

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail - Warden & Prefects 1896

Arthur Evans. 2nd Lt, 9th Bn, Essex Regt. kia Battle of the Somme. Detail – Warden & Prefects 1896

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The Butterworth Memorial in the Music School at Radley College. Designed by Laurence Whistler

The Butterworth Memorial in the Music School at Radley College. Designed by Laurence Whistler

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

20th September 1916. George Butterworth, MC. Don & Composer. Lt, 13th Bn, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action at Pozieres.

George Butterworth was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford, and from a very early age evinced great musical talent. One of his compositions was played at an Eton school concert while he was still a boy there. Among his musical publications are two cycles of songs from Housman’s “Shropshire Lad,” and an orchestral rhapsody, played at the last Leeds Festival, also at Queen’s Hall in the spring of 1914. He also devoted much time to the collection and arrangement of folk songs and folk dances in collaboration with Mr. Cecil Sharpe, and he took an active part in the formation and in the work of the Folk Dance Society. He contributed musical criticism to The Times intermittently for several years, and whatever he wrote showed shrewd judgment, sound knowledge, and independence of view. He was, in fact, a musician of great promise as well as a man of sterling character, who, if he had not given his life to a greater cause, would undoubtedly have done much to further a national ideal of musical art in this country. The Radleian

As a Don at Radley, he inspired a love of English pastoral music, reflected in the Music Society Minutes after he left. With Lance Vidal (kia 25 September 1915) he encouraged the boys to take up Morris dancing. He composed part of the Shropshire Lad Suite whilst at Radley.

Letter from his Commanding Officer to his father:

DEAR SIR ALEXANDER, I feel I must write you a note to tell you how deeply I grieve with you and yours for the loss of your gallant son. He was one of those quiet, unassuming men whose path did not appear naturally to be a military one, and I had watched him doing his duty quietly and conscientiously.

… Later we went into a line on the right of the Australians, S.E. of Pozieres.

Here we were about 450 yards from the Germans, and I gave orders to dig a trench within 200 yards of them so that we could attack with some chance of success.

This trench was dug in a fog, and was a very fine deep trench which saved many lives in the days to follow, and your son again superintended the work, and it was called Butterworth trench on all the official maps.

… Your son was in charge, and the trench was very much blown in and shallow, and I begged him to keep his head down. He was cheery and inspiring his tired men to secure the position which had been won earlier in the night. Within about a minute of my leaving him he was shot. I could ill afford to lose so fine a soldier…

Aged 31

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Robinson, JY Shield NU4croppedToday we remember …

Mesopotamia Campaign

23rd August 1916. John Robinson, MC. A Social, 1899. Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt.. Died of wounds received in the Battle of El Hannah, Mesopotamia (now Iraq).

John Robinson was one of the most distinguished Radleians to die in the War. At school he played for the Cricket and Football XIs and was Head of A Social. After school, he went to Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated with honours in history. He played Hockey for Oxford University for four years, became an international player and went on to win Gold for Great Britain at the 1908 Olympics.

After leaving university he became a schoolmaster. He enlisted in an OTC immediately War was declared, receiving his commission in September 1914. He served in the Gallipoli Campaign. He was Mentioned in Dispatches and awarded the Military Cross in February, 1916. The same month he was sent to Mesopotamia. He was wounded in the spine in April and died from the injury in August 1916.

His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 31

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

John Robinson, Captain & Adjutant, 7th Bn, North Staffordshire Regt. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wright at Serre Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ in aid of Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

14th July 1915. Charles Wright. G Social, 1904. Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. Killed in action at Bazentin-le-Petit.

On leaving school he went to Hertford College, Oxford, where he entered as an exhibitioner in October, 1909. He achieved a third class in the Final Honour School of Modern History in 1913. He rowed in the Hertford Eight for three years, and in his third year was Captain of Boats and President of the College.

After leaving Oxford he went to teach at Earleywood School, Ascot. War was declared on 4th August 1914. Charles had already joined the Inns of Court OTC on 3rd August. He obtained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment on 24th September, 1914, and was gazetted captain in August of 1915.

Aged 25

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Charles Wright, Captain, 7th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. kia Bazentin-le-Petit, Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

AH 'Sam' Hales, Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt. kia First Battle of the Somme

AH ‘Sam’ Hales, Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt. kia First Battle of the Somme

Today we remember…

5th July 1916. Arthur Hoare ‘Sam’ Hales, MC. Schoolmaster.  Captain, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regt.  Killed in action at Canal du Nord, Battle of the Somme.

‘Sam’ Hales was educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, taking honours in moderations and in the final school of modern history. He was in the Rugby School XV of 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and the Monkstown team of 1902. At Oxford he was a rowing ‘Blue’ and rowed in the 1904 and 1905 Boat Race crews. He was an extremely popular teacher at Radley where he was one of the group of young Dons who encouraged the growth of Rugby as the school’s major sport.

He enlisted immediately war was declared in August 1914, as a private. He was awarded his commission ‘for gallantry.’ He won the Military Cross in March 1915 ‘for bringing in the wounded under heavy fire.’

The Radleian published a letter from him describing everyday life in the trenches:

I have heard several times from Mr. Hales, who is sergeant in the Wiltshires. It will be news to hear that, during his first three days in the trenches, even he was absolutely dead beat, as they had to carry up sandbags to mend the gaps in the trenches. His legs absolutely gave out. On the first night he fell into a Jack Johnson hole and was not dry for a week afterwards. Nor could he use his rifle for a day and a half as it was jammed with mud. He is full of praise for the food and bully beef. He has been under heavy fire several times, but he claims to be very good at keeping his head down. When we returned this term we heard that he had been wounded, but his own account is as follows; “A graze on head and arm from a bullet that splintered through a sand bag. Both wounds quite dry by the time I left the trenches next day.’’

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Charles Ellerton at Ecoivres Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Ellerton at Ecoivres Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

19th May  1916.  Charles Ellerton. Don.  Capt, 10th Bn, Cheshire Regt.  Killed in action during preparations for the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
Charles Ellerton was born in Cheshire in 1884. He was a Scholar of Jesus College, Cambridge, who came to teach at Radley early in 1914. He signed up almost immediately war broke out in 1914.Extract from a letter received from an Officer at the Front re Captain C. F. Ellerton: ‘He died at the head of a party of his company charging the enemy. It was an act of unnecessary bravery, as it was only a small party and he might have detailed it to a subaltern. I was told by a witness that he saved the life of one boy who was going to be bayoneted, by rushing in front and throwing a bomb at the Germans. He was at first badly wounded and refused to be carried away, ordering the stretcher bearers to save themselves. Immediately afterwards he was killed.’

‘I saw his grave this afternoon. He is buried in the little cemetery in the wood at Mount St. Eloi. He was just reported missing, because it was not until the next night that it was possible to recover his body.’

The schoolboys he taught at Radley remembered him as ‘Though only here for a comparatively short time he made his influence felt in many ways here – on the “Rugger-field,” in “school,” and with the “recruits,” and there are many to whom the news of his death came as a real grief.’

Aged 32

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

This must be considered the darkest day in the history of Radley College. Eleven men from the College fell on this one day during the Battle of Loos and an unknown number were wounded. Many of the men were volunteers in Kitchener’s New Army, so the list of the Fallen includes young men from Radley village who had worked for the College and the first serving schoolmaster to be killed.

Although the long-drawn out campaigns of Gallipoli, the First Battle of the Somme, the Third Battle of Ypres (Paschendaele) claimed more lives overall, 25th September must stand forever as a day of mourning.

Lancelot Vidal, Schoolmaster, Tutor of A Social.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Reported missing, believed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘For days, even weeks, we entertained hopes that the news might be false, but eight weeks have now elapsed, and we can now only fear the worst.  He was last seen in the German trenches in the attack on Sept. 25th. when in charge of a machine gun … it has since been learnt that he was killed by a shell whilst pushing forward with his section in the early morning of September 25.’

Lance Vidal was the first serving schoolmaster of Radley College to fall in the Great War. He volunteered in 1914, having held the post of Tutor of A Social for two weeks. He was a popular Don at Radley and was one of those instrumental in introducing and promoting rugby football as the school’s major sport. He had played for Harlequins before joining Radley. He was also Master in Charge of Cricket.

Memorial1